WHAT IS ANGLICANISM?

Anglicanism is a Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation. The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional provinces of the international Anglican Communion which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism.

Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshipers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that bind the Anglican Communion together.

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WHAT IS THE ANGLICAN CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA?

The Anglican Church in North America unites 132,000 Anglicans in 1,004 congregations across the United States, Canada, and Mexico into a single Church. On April 16, 2009 it was recognized as a province of the global Anglican Communion, by the Primates of the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans. The Most Rev. Dr. Foley Beach is the Archbishop of the Church.

Members of the Anglican Church in North America are in the mainstream, both globally and historically, of Christianity – the biblically faithful way of following Jesus and being part of the “One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.” As Anglicans, this orthodoxy is defined by and centered on our church’s classic formularies – the Book of Common Prayer, including the Ordinal, and the Thirty-nine Articles – which all point back to the authority of the Holy Bible and articulate foundational principles of the Anglican tradition throughout the world. We wholeheartedly embrace the The Jerusalem Declaration, the founding declaration of the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans.